JUST WHAT IS MEANT BY “THE REDEMPTION OF THE BODY”? [1005]

Much is made of the redemption of the body by some, and perhaps not enough by others. Although in general terms the expectation is that the dead (dead bodies) will rise, being “resurrected”, there may be more to it. The new body that is spoken of may be vastly unlike the old, in fact there may be very little resemblance, if any at all. [Jesus was unrecognised after His resurrection].

So the events pertaining to this matter may have to be perused for information that will inform us of the truth of the matter. Paul said “not that I would be unclothed, but clothed with my heavenly dwelling” (2 Cor 5-4). The redemption and adoption? of the body appears to be the great hope that is “stored up for us in Heaven”. [Adoption Rom 8-23 “…waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body”]

Paul’s comment “not that I would be unclothed” is used to show that he does not simply wander off as some sort of “spirit”, (as in “go to heaven”) but that he is talking about the return of Christ at which time He will be the recipient of his inheritance in the form of his promised new heavenly body.

So it is in the hope of this promised body inheritance that we ‘strive’ for. The timing of this and the circumstances are to be scripturally sought for, especially whether or not it can be shown that specifically the old body is risen, or the new one. What are the words used to describe this “momentous event”?

Does it really matter whether or not the actual “old” body is raised, or whether it simply “appears” like some kind of magic trick? Whatever it is, it will be both magical and extraordinary.

“With what kind of body do they come? is the question, and the biblical answer is “you fool…” Let’s look up the reference. 1 Corin 15-35 onwards. And/plus. The dead are raised imperishable. The dead in Christ will rise first? “He will bring with Him those who have fallen asleep in Him” [we shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, ….] So perhaps the “rising” and the “bringing with Him” are the same thing?

1 Thess 4-16 The dead in Christ will rise first. 4-14 God will bring with Him those who have fallen asleep in Jesus. [sleep = dead]. A new body, stored [kept] in heaven?

“You are storing up for yourselves wrath…” [or righteousness].

1 Peter 1-4 imperishable inheritance, kept in Heaven for you.

So it seems the new body is a bit of an unknown, but that it will be like His own body, and it is kept in heaven waiting for us to ‘put it on’. “In my Father’s house are many mansions…” The works that are tested by fire are likely to be a reference to the new body itself, which is no doubt “composed of” everything that one has done in their lifetime,  works (that done while in the body) of the Spirit or flesh: whether good or bad. Fire will determine the outcome, whether there remains a new immortal body or whether what you were is completely burnt up. There is also “if a man’s works do not stand, he himself will be saved, but only as one escaping through the flames” which tends to show there is a certain standard attached to this process, but which is basically that you are a believer. [And “his works” may constitute the substance of His ‘heavenly dwelling’?]

Having left the “will it be the actual sown body that is raised?” question, this is getting bigger than Ben Hur so I might leave it at that for the time being. But the understanding seems to be that we reap what we sow, and this will be represented by the resurrected body which, in the environment of the Spirit, will either be an acceptable eternal imperishable and immortal body, which has been “stored up for us, in heaven”, or it will still be the old mortal flesh and blood body which has no spiritual counterpart by which to effect the redemptive process, and it will be at some stage, reduced to ashes in the process of confrontation with the fire of the Spirit.

[Clothed with my heavenly dwelling = Father’s house has many mansions?][ I go to prepare a place for you and will come back and take you to be where I am?][The thief on the cross was ‘barely’ or ‘hardly’ saved? (He ‘had no works’]

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