THE TRUE HEART OF MAN [16b]

Deep inside all people is the longing for love, true love. Covering this, is the near absolute power of the flesh, and sin, to prevent access to this position and place of love.

It is the sense of condemnation, of purposelessness, of darkness and loneliness, of isolation, that sends people spiralling down into the well of death.

What knowledge and experience is gained, may be for “better or worse”, depending on what we end up being married to in life, the good or the bad.

The spiritual reality of all this depends on the communicative power of God towards us, and the resistance offered to that communication. “God has not left himself without witness”?

People born into this world are familiarised with sin, which is our description of bad stuff that contaminates our world and lives. To find anything that lifts man up and promotes “peace and goodwill”, has to be beneficial, in one way.

But what if world religions leave people “content” [semi-content] with their lot, maybe because they have not been confronted with the notion of a perfect God, or they have been blinded to the relationship between God’s love for his family, and our relationship to our families?

And even some “Christian” “Faiths” have to be included in this because of their legalistic attitudes.

One wonders about cultural impacts that divide natural affections through misplaced concepts and traditions that effectively erect barriers to the freedom of thinking that the better parts of our western Christian culture have enabled for so many years.

If they have not been confronted with the God we are aware of, even through the law that was handed to Moses, then they may remain frustrated because  the barriers of their traditional customs keep them remote from the principle of a forgiving God. And this frustration may boil over into social problems.

So the deep sense of, and desire for, Love, needs to be satisfied in order to inspire the best of life in mankind. Only love can  reveal the true purpose set forth for man’s existence, and that is, to be a part of love, to be joined to love, and to live for love. And so far, there appears to be only one God of [true] love in sight.

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten son, that whosoever believes in him should not die, but live forever.

PAULS CONFLICT [13b]

Knowledge of good and evil  =  wretched man               [romans7]

What has happened to this man Paul, that he discovers his own will is worthless and inoperable? Why is it that the performing of good is impossible for him to do?

What is inside him that is sabotaging his ability to provide a good outcome?

I wish someone else would explain it because I am likely to be stumbling around a bit with this. (so what’s new you say?).[2005]

Is it that because the more he knows, the more he realises that the good his will proposes to do, is the very opposite of that mental pathway that is set up because he knows he is inherently “not good”?

That he is himself, by his own judgement, guilty of producing sin, and so therefore is condemned to a poor outcome, because the input thought to his mental process is already in conflict with the proposed outcome?

It is as if, being self-condemned, he must not allow a clear passage of this thought streaming to go unchallenged, and in fact, brings it to a premature death, just as he believes he himself deserves. It is certainly a psychological process, which may well be understood in medical terms already.

In other words, the knowledge of good, having made him aware of the knowledge of bad, has brought judgement down on his integrity, thus destroying his inherent integral thought processes, in order to maintain the truth of the judgement he perceives that has been brought down on him, by himself, and God..

Adam only knew the good, until he brought in the opposite which was bad. And it was by the knowledge of the “new player” that he became conscious of the bad, because it was in contrast to his previous good..

Is it (and it has to be) related to “the fall” of Adam, where he was “in the clear” so to speak, “until the commandment came”, following which he was conflicted, guilty, and disenfranchised from his former position, removed from the place of truth and therefore true rationality, and so became irrational.

And from within this irrationality, he was unable to return to a rational place. (his lost innocence was irretrievable). And, in this state, he was unfit to retain the status of “eternal life”, and having lost it, could not “of himself” regain it. (The strength of this irrationality may be seen in the subsequent behaviour of his son Cain).

It is as if it were some spiritual law* that cannot be circumvented, is unavoidable, because it is TRUTH. Now, we might say, there are two truths. The one is the real truth, the truth of life, while the other is the imposter, the “truth” of the LIE.

When the truth comes into contact with the lie, that clash causes CONFLICT.

Paul, who is a seeker of truth, of righteousness, even though it is a “poor man’s righteousness”, being that of the law, (which nonetheless came with “glory”, being of God, and being “spiritual”), has his conscience engaged regarding truth and justice, and it is this which comes into conflict with the inherent LIE which has become an entity “in his flesh”, to the extent of being said to “be his flesh”. [italics not meant as scriptural quotes but for literary explanatory purposes].

It is this overwhelming conflict, which is driven by guilt and judgement and its inherent fear of death, which “disengages his moral drive” and leaves him floundering in no man’s land. And no man’s land provides the opportunity for the inhabitation of evil.

So there can be no good outcome, since the production of good comes from “….a sound mind….” [Timothy?]

And since there is no good outcome, there can only be a bad one. Given that there is something still left of his will that has not been completely frozen into submission, though unable to produce good, still has enough “inertia” to promote strife and trouble once it enters the conflict zone. * And this “law” that is in operation may be “the law of sin and death”.

So Paul, “of himself” is a dead man. WRETCHED. It is only when he is no longer “of himself”, being “of Christ”, that  power returns to his moral drive. He is released from judgement and condemnation, and his conscience is free to proceed with moral judgement that is in line with the gift he now has internally, the Spirit of God.   [Paul’s conflict here is mind law flesh, whereas Galatians is Spirit flesh]

This position of Paul results in the typical defensive position of people forced to hide behind their sin, because of their sin.[later edit. Paul is under wrath][2020 edit – “Law brings wrath”]

SIN NULLIFIED [12c]

Sin is no longer consequential for those who want it to be no longer consequential. All sin has already been assigned to death, it has no other outcome. Christ suffered it so we could avoid that outcome. So we could recognise the truth and cleave to it, to him. Recognition of this and appreciation of his pain in suffering our sin to free us from it, the very thing that killed us, unites us with him in the pursuance of life instead of death.

Whether or not we remain in sin, does not effect the outcome of what he has done. All sin  will be as nothing, will be removed in the end. [and he has already said that the consequences of sin have been far removed from us already] What is important is whether or not we remain attached to sin. If we remain attached to it, we die with it. If we separate ourselves from it, we will live with him. If in fact he has already dealt with it in such a way that it has absolutely no power at all to condemn or accuse, because he has finished the matter, having treated it as his forgiveness of us who “didn’t ask to be born” [as a friend would say], then it becomes a non event, virtually whether we sin or not.

Sin is no longer the focus, life is. And we must cleave to life because he has said that death “is no more” unless we want it to be. If he has restored us to the “Pre-Adam” state, in terms of guilt, then we need to act guilt free and pursue those things that do not attract guilt. In other words, to recognise that we now have a clean slate, and that sin which “dirtied” the slate can never ever do that again, because God has eliminated it forever through Christ’s sacrifice. Sin is no longer the issue, it is or it is not, it matters not. What does matter is that we accept this free life and take advantage of it.

One might advance an argument that it is “only those who are forgiven, that are forgiven”. But what if, rather than applying to a select few, this applies to all, even “the sin of the whole world”. What if ALL are “forgiven” in the sense that ALL have had their sin “covered”, and are therefore on that basis, offered life. It only remains then, to believe it. Or not. What if God is totally accepting ALL responsibility for bringing into this world of sin, sinners. What if the greatest way of looking at salvation, is in fact true.

If we put conditions on salvation; if this, and if that; then interpretation of scriptures and differing doctrinal interpretations may always interrupt the clean flow of redemption. There may be things that are offered as aids to believing, as aids to faith, as aids to accepting the release from sin. But nothing in the way of “props” or rituals will alter the truth or reality that is God’s love towards us as accomplished in Christ. He opened the door. He himself became the gate whereby men “go in and go out and find pasture”[?]. I maintain that in this case, if it seems too good to be true, it’s because we are unwilling to believe in Him, his nature, his love.

That which needed to be done to restore mankind, has been done. It only remains for mankind to believe it and to become it. By believing it. Digging up scriptures regards this might be an interesting exercise. An early objection might be that one needs to be baptised [ in water, since the Spirit would obviously be involved already.] There may be all manner of conventional doctrine against this position. Then again, this may actually BE the orthodox position, and only sects and other groups may amass objections to it. That would be revealing in itself!

While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

JESUS ENTERED INTO THE DARKNESS [165aj]

The difficulty of understanding all aspects of the cross may be lessened by understanding why Jesus said “My God…” in relation to his Father, since that is how most of mankind views God, as some sort of distant upholder of the law who is intent on bringing us to justice for our sins.

The subject of light and darkness is present in scripture as a means of understanding the good happy stuff as distinct from the bad sad stuff. That God is light and we (sin) are darkness. That he dwells in light while we dwell in darkness. [darkness is scary because you can’t see where you’re going].

When Jesus “bore our sin”, he entered into the darkness that is common to mankind, he entered into the state of separation from God who is light. This separation from God is a theme which began in the garden when Adam failed to maintain his relationship with God, who was his Father. Henceforth his relationship would be felt by him [Adam] as one who was an outcast from God’s presence, and as one who was unworthy of God’s love.

He felt this condition because his PERCEPTION of God had been altered by the cloud of sin and guilt that acted as a filter to prevent his own view of himself as being one who was acceptable and lovable. Where once there was only the singularity of God and his love, there now lay the complexity of sin and guilt, which heavily filtered out the light and brought darkness to his “soul”. [this darkness is seen as condemnation and “wrath” ]

Jesus was “made in all points as us”. This means he was not only the perfect son of God, but that he was a “heavenly Spirit” who lived in an earthly body. As such, his identity was always that of consciously being “The Son of God”, and to him, God was his Father. “Do you not know that I must be about my Father’s business” he said when he was twelve years old or so. This identity heavily “polarised” him so that his conscious self always dwelt within this identity, and any temptation that came to him was immediately isolated as being from an “alien” source.

This position/condition remained with him throughout his life until he began to enter into his “passion”, which means until he began to enter into the realm within himself that was identified as man’s “world”, man’s consciousness, man’s deficiencies, and man’s sins and the very mechanism within from which and by which sin is generated. This passion began in the garden, where he began to feel the effects of it so severely that he literally began to die*. “Father if it be thy will let this cup pass from me, but nevertheless, thy will be done”.

This is ultimately portrayed on the cross where literal darkness came over the scene. Jesus cried “My God, my God, why have you forsaken [abandoned] [left] me.” He was no longer feeling the loving presence of his Father, he was feeling the same sense of isolation from Love that we feel, he was caught up in the darkness of “soul” that we feel, his perception was not that of his loving Father but that of an angry God who was confronting him with the sin that by indwelling mankind, continued to express and produce the works of darkness that he now felt within him.

He stayed in this condition, feeling what we call “hell”, subject to all that we perceive to be the “punishment” of hell, feeling the burning wrath of the inner conflict that had now erupted into anguish and agony of soul. Until at last all of the inner death that mankind had “brought to the table” had been extinguished, had been overcome, had been brought to a state of life, where previously there was only death. Sure, he could have bailed at any time, he could have, as Spirit, returned to the Father. But once entered into the battle, it was inconceivable that he would quit the mission for which he was born. He was entitled to retain life, but having uttered the words “It is finished”, having defeated the “enemy” and restored the human condition, he surrendered his life, his Spirit,  to God. To his now restored perception, of God as Father. He died.

God the Father was never any different, had not changed, yet sin had changed man’s idea, view, of God into being someone who was out for revenge, someone who wanted to set things right by punishing us for sin. And we feel that sense of punishment within, we feel the impending doom through guilt and fear of death, yet God has never changed from being the loving Father to us all. He has never wanted us to die in our sins, he has always been available to wash us in his love, to restore us from darkness to light. We simply have been blinded to him in that way, because of the indwelling  darkness of sin.

Jesus was the revelation of the true nature of God. He came to remove the blinkers from our eyes, to take the shroud of death from our hearts, to release us from the misery of self condemnation that was empowered by the law that exists within us because we were made as sons of God. That law that is reinforced by the correct judgement we bring to bear on ourselves, so that, unable to bear it, we hide from it and from him, because the perceived unattainable love is so painful and miserable a condition. Jesus entered into this same condition, and destroyed its validity, destroyed its falseness of accusation against us and God, so that by our recognition of his loving righteousness in restoring us in Jesus, we rightly judge and agree with his action in forgiving us in this way as being the ultimate righteousness of all.

As created sons of God, we condemned ourselves to the point where our perception was that God was of the same nature as our false perception.

Christ didn’t remove the barrier between us and God because there never was one. What he did was to reveal his Father as being our Father, by presenting him in the correct perspective in relation to us and our own faulty perspective. Certainly he destroyed the faulty nature of man and suffered that which was the natural outcome of our “sickness”.

But by showing the outcome of this process as being life itself, he draws us to himself and the heavenly Father. We are drawn to his love which is able to cleanse us as we submit to that which always was, from the perfection of his concern for us to perfect us in the love that he is. By faith our sins are remitted, as they do not exist in his eyes, but only in our eyes. Such sorrow there may be as to hold us back from such submission, but such love must ultimately bring us to his heart and allow that love to consume us and consume our faults, our defects, our sin and darkness. “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life”, no man comes to the Father but by me”.

Jesus exampled the father and also humanity within his own body. In this way he has become the high Priest for us, the intermediary for us. We are perfected in him, once we commit to him. We are not perfect as he is perfect, but we are perfected in that we will live with him regardless of our “performance” as we continue in the process of ultimate perfection, in which we are saved regardless of our ultimate condition, as long as we remain in him. “live a life of love”. “All things are yours”.

Love is the active ingredient that engages the enemy and suffers because of it. The nature of love is something that is continued in as faith builds a new reality which is really an old reality (I give you a new commandment which is really an old commandment) but is the reality of God and his love for us. Love one another, bear each others burdens, and so fulfill the “law” of Christ.

[* The idea of Jesus beginning to die was introduced by a certain theologian, but which should not dispel the accepted concept of it simply being the repugnancy of/for the condition of the sin experience he was about to enter. He also knew that when he was in this state that he would be unable to understand this separation from the Father, giving rise to “why have you forsaken me?”]

https://www.compellingtruth.org/Jesus-died-for-our-sins.html

This link is provided to an article on the atonement, but I have not yet checked out the source, nor many of the other associated articles. I know they have got at least one thing wrong, that being where they say that Paul in Romans 7 was struggling with sin, which is a bad error if they are saying He did this as a Christian, which I think is what they are saying. And while it covers many subjects, it may be the opening of a can of theological errors. For those with the time to investigate further, it may be an interesting exercise in futility, or an expose’ of whoever the originating authority is. THEIR Romans 7 ref.   https://www.compellingtruth.org/assurance-of-salvation.html

Canxiety Cdepression

JESUS ENTERED INTO THE DARKNESS [165ai]

The difficulty of understanding all aspects of the cross may be lessened by understanding why Jesus said “My God…” in relation to his Father, since that is how most of mankind views God, as some sort of distant upholder of the law who is intent on bringing us to justice for our sins.

The subject of light and darkness is present in scripture as a means of understanding the good happy stuff as distinct from the bad sad stuff. That God is light and we (sin) are darkness. That he dwells in light while we dwell in darkness. [darkness is scary because you can’t see where you’re going].

When Jesus “bore our sin”, he entered into the darkness that is common to mankind, he entered into the state of separation from God who is light. This separation from God is a theme which began in the garden when Adam failed to maintain his relationship with God, who was his Father. Henceforth his relationship would be felt by him [Adam] as one who was an outcast from God’s presence, and as one who was unworthy of God’s love.

He felt this condition because his PERCEPTION of God had been altered by the cloud of sin and guilt that acted as a filter to prevent his own view of himself as being one who was acceptable and lovable. Where once there was only the singularity of God and his love, there now lay the complexity of sin and guilt, which heavily filtered out the light and brought darkness to his “soul”. [this darkness is seen as condemnation and “wrath” ]

Jesus was “made in all points as us”. This means he was not only the perfect son of God, but that he was a “heavenly Spirit” who lived in an earthly body. As such, his identity was always that of consciously being “The Son of God”, and to him, God was his Father. “Do you not know that I must be about my Father’s business” he said when he was twelve years old or so. This identity heavily “polarised” him so that his conscious self always dwelt within this identity, and any temptation that came to him was immediately isolated as being from an “alien” source.

This position/condition remained with him throughout his life until he began to enter into his “passion”, which means until he began to enter into the realm within himself that was identified as man’s “world”, man’s consciousness, man’s deficiencies, and man’s sins and the very mechanism within from which and by which sin is generated. This passion began in the garden, where he began to feel the effects of it so severely that he literally began to die*. “Father if it be thy will let this cup pass from me, but nevertheless, thy will be done”.

This is ultimately portrayed on the cross where literal darkness came over the scene. Jesus cried “My God, my God, why have you forsaken [abandoned] [left] me.” He was no longer feeling the loving presence of his Father, he was feeling the same sense of isolation from Love that we feel, he was caught up in the darkness of “soul” that we feel, his perception was not that of his loving Father but that of an angry God who was confronting him with the sin that by indwelling mankind, continued to express and produce the works of darkness that he now felt within him.

He stayed in this condition, feeling what we call “hell”, subject to all that we perceive to be the “punishment” of hell, feeling the burning wrath of the inner conflict that had now erupted into anguish and agony of soul. Until at last all of the inner death that mankind had “brought to the table” had been extinguished, had been overcome, had been brought to a state of life, where previously there was only death. Sure, he could have bailed at any time, he could have, as Spirit, returned to the Father. But once entered into the battle, it was inconceivable that he would quit the mission for which he was born. He was entitled to retain life, but having uttered the words “It is finished”, having defeated the “enemy” and restored the human condition, he surrendered his life, his Spirit,  to God. To his now restored perception, of God as Father. He died.

God the Father was never any different, had not changed, yet sin had changed man’s idea, view, of God into being someone who was out for revenge, someone who wanted to set things right by punishing us for sin. And we feel that sense of punishment within, we feel the impending doom through guilt and fear of death, yet God has never changed from being the loving Father to us all. He has never wanted us to die in our sins, he has always been available to wash us in his love, to restore us from darkness to light. We simply have been blinded to him in that way, because of the indwelling  darkness of sin.

Jesus was the revelation of the true nature of God. He came to remove the blinkers from our eyes, to take the shroud of death from our hearts, to release us from the misery of self condemnation that was empowered by the law that exists within us because we were made as sons of God. That law that is reinforced by the correct judgement we bring to bear on ourselves, so that, unable to bear it, we hide from it and from him, because the perceived unattainable love is so painful and miserable a condition. Jesus entered into this same condition, and destroyed its validity, destroyed its falseness of accusation against us and God, so that by our recognition of his loving righteousness in restoring us in Jesus, we rightly judge and agree with his action in forgiving us in this way as being the ultimate righteousness of all.

As created sons of God, we condemned ourselves to the point where our perception was that God was of the same nature as our false perception.

Christ didn’t remove the barrier between us and God because there never was one. What he did was to reveal his Father as being our Father, by presenting him in the correct perspective in relation to us and our own faulty perspective. Certainly he destroyed the faulty nature of man and suffered that which was the natural outcome of our “sickness”.

But by showing the outcome of this process as being life itself, he draws us to himself and the heavenly Father. We are drawn to his love which is able to cleanse us as we submit to that which always was, from the perfection of his concern for us to perfect us in the love that he is. By faith our sins are remitted, as they do not exist in his eyes, but only in our eyes. Such sorrow there may be as to hold us back from such submission, but such love must ultimately bring us to his heart and allow that love to consume us and consume our faults, our defects, our sin and darkness. “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life”, no man comes to the Father but by me”.

Jesus exampled the father and also humanity within his own body. In this way he has become the high Priest for us, the intermediary for us. We are perfected in him, once we commit to him. We are not perfect as he is perfect, but we are perfected in that we will live with him regardless of our “performance” as we continue in the process of ultimate perfection, in which we are saved regardless of our ultimate condition, as long as we remain in him. “live a life of love”. “All things are yours”.

Love is the active ingredient that engages the enemy and suffers because of it. The nature of love is something that is continued in as faith builds a new reality which is really an old reality (I give you a new commandment which is really an old commandment) but is the reality of God and his love for us. Love one another, bear each others burdens, and so fulfill the “law” of Christ.

[* The idea of Jesus beginning to die was introduced by a certain theologian, but which should not dispel the accepted concept of it simply being the repugnancy of/for the condition of the sin experience he was about to enter. He also knew that when he was in this state that he would be unable to understand this separation from the Father, giving rise to “why have you forsaken me?”]

https://www.compellingtruth.org/Jesus-died-for-our-sins.html

This link is provided to an article on the atonement, but I have not yet checked out the source, nor many of the other associated articles. I know they have got at least one thing wrong, that being where they say that Paul in Romans 7 was struggling with sin, which is a bad error if they are saying He did this as a Christian, which I think is what they are saying. And while it covers many subjects, it may be the opening of a can of theological errors. For those with the time to investigate further, it may be an interesting exercise in futility, or an expose’ of whoever the originating authority is. THEIR Romans 7 ref.   https://www.compellingtruth.org/assurance-of-salvation.html

Canxiety Cdepression

JESUS ENTERED INTO THE DARKNESS [165ah]

The difficulty of understanding all aspects of the cross may be lessened by understanding why Jesus said “My God…” in relation to his Father, since that is how most of mankind views God, as some sort of distant upholder of the law who is intent on bringing us to justice for our sins.

The subject of light and darkness is present in scripture as a means of understanding the good happy stuff as distinct from the bad sad stuff. That God is light and we (sin) are darkness. That he dwells in light while we dwell in darkness. [darkness is scary because you can’t see where you’re going].

When Jesus “bore our sin”, he entered into the darkness that is common to mankind, he entered into the state of separation from God who is light. This separation from God is a theme which began in the garden when Adam failed to maintain his relationship with God, who was his Father. Henceforth his relationship would be felt by him [Adam] as one who was an outcast from God’s presence, and as one who was unworthy of God’s love.

He felt this condition because his PERCEPTION of God had been altered by the cloud of sin and guilt that acted as a filter to prevent his own view of himself as being one who was acceptable and lovable. Where once there was only the singularity of God and his love, there now lay the complexity of sin and guilt, which heavily filtered out the light and brought darkness to his “soul”. [this darkness is seen as condemnation and “wrath” ]

Jesus was “made in all points as us”. This means he was not only the perfect son of God, but that he was a “heavenly Spirit” who lived in an earthly body. As such, his identity was always that of consciously being “The Son of God”, and to him, God was his Father. “Do you not know that I must be about my Father’s business” he said when he was twelve years old or so. This identity heavily “polarised” him so that his conscious self always dwelt within this identity, and any temptation that came to him was immediately isolated as being from an “alien” source.

This position/condition remained with him throughout his life until he began to enter into his “passion”, which means until he began to enter into the realm within himself that was identified as man’s “world”, man’s consciousness, man’s deficiencies, and man’s sins and the very mechanism within from which and by which sin is generated. This passion began in the garden, where he began to feel the effects of it so severely that he literally began to die*. “Father if it be thy will let this cup pass from me, but nevertheless, thy will be done”.

This is ultimately portrayed on the cross where literal darkness came over the scene. Jesus cried “My God, my God, why have you forsaken [abandoned] [left] me.” He was no longer feeling the loving presence of his Father, he was feeling the same sense of isolation from Love that we feel, he was caught up in the darkness of “soul” that we feel, his perception was not that of his loving Father but that of an angry God who was confronting him with the sin that by indwelling mankind, continued to express and produce the works of darkness that he now felt within him.

He stayed in this condition, feeling what we call “hell”, subject to all that we perceive to be the “punishment” of hell, feeling the burning wrath of the inner conflict that had now erupted into anguish and agony of soul. Until at last all of the inner death that mankind had “brought to the table” had been extinguished, had been overcome, had been brought to a state of life, where previously there was only death. Sure, he could have bailed at any time, he could have, as Spirit, returned to the Father. But once entered into the battle, it was inconceivable that he would quit the mission for which he was born. He was entitled to retain life, but having uttered the words “It is finished”, having defeated the “enemy” and restored the human condition, he surrendered his life, his Spirit,  to God. To his now restored perception, of God as Father. He died.

God the Father was never any different, had not changed, yet sin had changed man’s idea, view, of God into being someone who was out for revenge, someone who wanted to set things right by punishing us for sin. And we feel that sense of punishment within, we feel the impending doom through guilt and fear of death, yet God has never changed from being the loving Father to us all. He has never wanted us to die in our sins, he has always been available to wash us in his love, to restore us from darkness to light. We simply have been blinded to him in that way, because of the indwelling  darkness of sin.

Jesus was the revelation of the true nature of God. He came to remove the blinkers from our eyes, to take the shroud of death from our hearts, to release us from the misery of self condemnation that was empowered by the law that exists within us because we were made as sons of God. That law that is reinforced by the correct judgement we bring to bear on ourselves, so that, unable to bear it, we hide from it and from him, because the perceived unattainable love is so painful and miserable a condition. Jesus entered into this same condition, and destroyed its validity, destroyed its falseness of accusation against us and God, so that by our recognition of his loving righteousness in restoring us in Jesus, we rightly judge and agree with his action in forgiving us in this way as being the ultimate righteousness of all.

As created sons of God, we condemned ourselves to the point where our perception was that God was of the same nature as our false perception.

Christ didn’t remove the barrier between us and God because there never was one. What he did was to reveal his Father as being our Father, by presenting him in the correct perspective in relation to us and our own faulty perspective. Certainly he destroyed the faulty nature of man and suffered that which was the natural outcome of our “sickness”.

But by showing the outcome of this process as being life itself, he draws us to himself and the heavenly Father. We are drawn to his love which is able to cleanse us as we submit to that which always was, from the perfection of his concern for us to perfect us in the love that he is. By faith our sins are remitted, as they do not exist in his eyes, but only in our eyes. Such sorrow there may be as to hold us back from such submission, but such love must ultimately bring us to his heart and allow that love to consume us and consume our faults, our defects, our sin and darkness. “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life”, no man comes to the Father but by me”.

Jesus exampled the father and also humanity within his own body. In this way he has become the high Priest for us, the intermediary for us. We are perfected in him, once we commit to him. We are not perfect as he is perfect, but we are perfected in that we will live with him regardless of our “performance” as we continue in the process of ultimate perfection, in which we are saved regardless of our ultimate condition, as long as we remain in him. “live a life of love”. “All things are yours”.

Love is the active ingredient that engages the enemy and suffers because of it. The nature of love is something that is continued in as faith builds a new reality which is really an old reality (I give you a new commandment which is really an old commandment) but is the reality of God and his love for us. Love one another, bear each others burdens, and so fulfill the “law” of Christ.

[* The idea of Jesus beginning to die was introduced by a certain theologian, but which should not dispel the accepted concept of it simply being the repugnancy of/for the condition of the sin experience he was about to enter. He also knew that when he was in this state that he would be unable to understand this separation from the Father, giving rise to “why have you forsaken me?”]

https://www.compellingtruth.org/Jesus-died-for-our-sins.html

This link is provided to an article on the atonement, but I have not yet checked out the source, nor many of the other associated articles. I know they have got at least one thing wrong, that being where they say that Paul in Romans 7 was struggling with sin, which is a bad error if they are saying He did this as a Christian, which I think is what they are saying. And while it covers many subjects, it may be the opening of a can of theological errors. For those with the time to investigate further, it may be an interesting exercise in futility, or an expose’ of whoever the originating authority is. THEIR Romans 7 ref.   https://www.compellingtruth.org/assurance-of-salvation.html

Canxiety Cdepression

JESUS ENTERED INTO THE DARKNESS [165ag]

The difficulty of understanding all aspects of the cross may be lessened by understanding why Jesus said “My God…” in relation to his Father, since that is how most of mankind views God, as some sort of distant upholder of the law who is intent on bringing us to justice for our sins.

The subject of light and darkness is present in scripture as a means of understanding the good happy stuff as distinct from the bad sad stuff. That God is light and we (sin) are darkness. That he dwells in light while we dwell in darkness. [darkness is scary because you can’t see where you’re going].

When Jesus “bore our sin”, he entered into the darkness that is common to mankind, he entered into the state of separation from God who is light. This separation from God is a theme which began in the garden when Adam failed to maintain his relationship with God, who was his Father. Henceforth his relationship would be felt by him [Adam] as one who was an outcast from God’s presence, and as one who was unworthy of God’s love.

He felt this condition because his PERCEPTION of God had been altered by the cloud of sin and guilt that acted as a filter to prevent his own view of himself as being one who was acceptable and lovable. Where once there was only the singularity of God and his love, there now lay the complexity of sin and guilt, which heavily filtered out the light and brought darkness to his “soul”. [this darkness is seen as condemnation and “wrath” ]

Jesus was “made in all points as us”. This means he was not only the perfect son of God, but that he was a “heavenly Spirit” who lived in an earthly body. As such, his identity was always that of consciously being “The Son of God”, and to him, God was his Father. “Do you not know that I must be about my Father’s business” he said when he was twelve years old or so. This identity heavily “polarised” him so that his conscious self always dwelt within this identity, and any temptation that came to him was immediately isolated as being from an “alien” source.

This position/condition remained with him throughout his life until he began to enter into his “passion”, which means until he began to enter into the realm within himself that was identified as man’s “world”, man’s consciousness, man’s deficiencies, and man’s sins and the very mechanism within from which and by which sin is generated. This passion began in the garden, where he began to feel the effects of it so severely that he literally began to die*. “Father if it be thy will let this cup pass from me, but nevertheless, thy will be done”.

This is ultimately portrayed on the cross where literal darkness came over the scene. Jesus cried “My God, my God, why have you forsaken [abandoned] [left] me.” He was no longer feeling the loving presence of his Father, he was feeling the same sense of isolation from Love that we feel, he was caught up in the darkness of “soul” that we feel, his perception was not that of his loving Father but that of an angry God who was confronting him with the sin that by indwelling mankind, continued to express and produce the works of darkness that he now felt within him.

He stayed in this condition, feeling what we call “hell”, subject to all that we perceive to be the “punishment” of hell, feeling the burning wrath of the inner conflict that had now erupted into anguish and agony of soul. Until at last all of the inner death that mankind had “brought to the table” had been extinguished, had been overcome, had been brought to a state of life, where previously there was only death. Sure, he could have bailed at any time, he could have, as Spirit, returned to the Father. But once entered into the battle, it was inconceivable that he would quit the mission for which he was born. He was entitled to retain life, but having uttered the words “It is finished”, having defeated the “enemy” and restored the human condition, he surrendered his life, his Spirit,  to God. To his now restored perception, of God as Father. He died.

God the Father was never any different, had not changed, yet sin had changed man’s idea, view, of God into being someone who was out for revenge, someone who wanted to set things right by punishing us for sin. And we feel that sense of punishment within, we feel the impending doom through guilt and fear of death, yet God has never changed from being the loving Father to us all. He has never wanted us to die in our sins, he has always been available to wash us in his love, to restore us from darkness to light. We simply have been blinded to him in that way, because of the indwelling  darkness of sin.

Jesus was the revelation of the true nature of God. He came to remove the blinkers from our eyes, to take the shroud of death from our hearts, to release us from the misery of self condemnation that was empowered by the law that exists within us because we were made as sons of God. That law that is reinforced by the correct judgement we bring to bear on ourselves, so that, unable to bear it, we hide from it and from him, because the perceived unattainable love is so painful and miserable a condition. Jesus entered into this same condition, and destroyed its validity, destroyed its falseness of accusation against us and God, so that by our recognition of his loving righteousness in restoring us in Jesus, we rightly judge and agree with his action in forgiving us in this way as being the ultimate righteousness of all.

As created sons of God, we condemned ourselves to the point where our perception was that God was of the same nature as our false perception.

Christ didn’t remove the barrier between us and God because there never was one. What he did was to reveal his Father as being our Father, by presenting him in the correct perspective in relation to us and our own faulty perspective. Certainly he destroyed the faulty nature of man and suffered that which was the natural outcome of our “sickness”.

But by showing the outcome of this process as being life itself, he draws us to himself and the heavenly Father. We are drawn to his love which is able to cleanse us as we submit to that which always was, from the perfection of his concern for us to perfect us in the love that he is. By faith our sins are remitted, as they do not exist in his eyes, but only in our eyes. Such sorrow there may be as to hold us back from such submission, but such love must ultimately bring us to his heart and allow that love to consume us and consume our faults, our defects, our sin and darkness. “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life”, no man comes to the Father but by me”.

Jesus exampled the father and also humanity within his own body. In this way he has become the high Priest for us, the intermediary for us. We are perfected in him, once we commit to him. We are not perfect as he is perfect, but we are perfected in that we will live with him regardless of our “performance” as we continue in the process of ultimate perfection, in which we are saved regardless of our ultimate condition, as long as we remain in him. “live a life of love”. “All things are yours”.

Love is the active ingredient that engages the enemy and suffers because of it. The nature of love is something that is continued in as faith builds a new reality which is really an old reality (I give you a new commandment which is really an old commandment) but is the reality of God and his love for us. Love one another, bear each others burdens, and so fulfill the “law” of Christ.

[* The idea of Jesus beginning to die was introduced by a certain theologian, but which should not dispel the accepted concept of it simply being the repugnancy of/for the condition of the sin experience he was about to enter. He also knew that when he was in this state that he would be unable to understand this separation from the Father, giving rise to “why have you forsaken me?”]

https://www.compellingtruth.org/Jesus-died-for-our-sins.html

This link is provided to an article on the atonement, but I have not yet checked out the source, nor many of the other associated articles. I know they have got at least one thing wrong, that being where they say that Paul in Romans 7 was struggling with sin, which is a bad error if they are saying He did this as a Christian, which I think is what they are saying. And while it covers many subjects, it may be the opening of a can of theological errors. For those with the time to investigate further, it may be an interesting exercise in futility, or an expose’ of whoever the originating authority is. THEIR Romans 7 ref.   https://www.compellingtruth.org/assurance-of-salvation.html

Canxiety Cdepression

THERE IS ONLY ONE REAL RESURRECTION [1276a]

When all is said and done, there is only one resurrection that really matters, and that is the one which Christ experienced on our behalf. I say on our behalf, because it is only because HE is resurrected, that we can be also. Our resurrection and His amount to the same thing, because we join with Him in His, by taking on all that He is, and dying with Him in the same way that He did, to self and flesh, and then also rising with Him, IN THIS PRESENT LIFE. THIS is our “resurrection”. If this is not the case then there will be no further resurrection to life at all at anytime.

The “First Resurrection” is His and Himself, and we only because we have died and been resurrected spiritually with Him, to the point where we are said to be seated with Him in heaven. If we have not been already ‘spiritually’ resurrected with Him, or deny that we have, then we NEVER will be. We may experience a “resurrection”, but it will be one of death, that results in death, since our resurrection in Him is that identical experience of “being born again”, without which you remain in death.

“Those who take part in the first resurrection will not be harmed by the second death”. But those who do NOT take part in that first resurrection, which is Christ Himself, WILL be harmed by the “second death”. ‘Futuristically’, believers will simply have the life they already hold in Christ, confirmed, just as those outside of Christ will have their death confirmed.

THERE IS ONLY ONE REAL RESURRECTION [1276]

When all is said and done, there is only one resurrection that really matters, and that is the one which Christ experienced on our behalf. I say on our behalf, because it is only because HE is resurrected, that we can be also. Our resurrection and His amount to the same thing, because we join with Him in His, by taking on all that He is, and dying with Him in the same way that He did, to self and flesh, and then also rising with Him, IN THIS PRESENT LIFE. THIS is our “resurrection”. If this is not the case then there will be no further resurrection to life at all at anytime.

The “First Resurrection” is His and Himself, and we only because we have died and been resurrected spiritually with Him, to the point where we are said to be seated with Him in heaven. If we have not been already ‘spiritually’ resurrected with Him, or deny that we have, then we NEVER will be. We may experience a “resurrection”, but it will be one of death, that results in death, since our resurrection in Him is that identical experience of “being born again”, without which you remain in death.

“Those who take part in the first resurrection will not be harmed by the second death”. But those who do NOT take part in that first resurrection, which is Christ Himself, WILL be harmed by the “second death”. ‘Futuristically’, believers will simply have the life they already hold in Christ, confirmed, just as those outside of Christ will have their death confirmed.

JUST WHAT IS THIS SPIRIT [1192a]

“This Spirit” is that which eventuates from taking hold of the cross of Christ. It is the Spirit that comes from forgiveness of sin and of release from death. Of union with the living Christ. It is the Spirit of Christ Himself as it enters into us by faith, by belief. It is Jesus Himself come to be with us and never to leave us.

As we embrace the revealed Jesus, we embrace ourselves, our past mistakes, errors, sins. WE embrace them in the embrace of the death in which He wrapped us to fulfil the truth of all things. We embrace Him, His death for us and His resurrection for us also. We accept His devotion to us, and we return it.

Spirit of truth, Spirit of life, Spirit of righteousness and of love. Jesus is ours and we are His. This Spirit of life is Himself and He in us.